Growing, Moving and Standing in Faith

I had a great interview with Faith and Leadership, a learning resource for Christian leaders and their institutions from Leadership Education at Duke University Divinity School.

 

Throughout her life — through high school, college, seminary and graduate school — Monica A. Coleman always excelled. But beneath her success was a deep sadness she tried to keep hidden, a grief that seemed to run through her entire family.

“I was building a résumé, and getting good grades, and getting scholarships, and going to school, and doing all these other things that a lot of people can’t do while living with depression, or in between depression,” Coleman said. “I just thought this was ‘normal’ Monica — the Monica people would like, the Monica people would accept. And I tried to hide the sad Monica.”

In her new book, “Bipolar Faith: A Black Woman’s Journey with Depression and Faith(link is external),” Coleman, a professor at Claremont School of Theology, talks about her struggles with mental illness and her path to recovery.

Read the entire interview here

Book Monica A. Coleman to speak at your event.

Monica speaks with heart and vulnerability as she discusses some of the most challenging issues of our day. She speaks out on issues that churches and society often keep silent: mental health, sexual and domestic violence and religious diversity. In the pulpit, she offers a refreshing view of how scripture leads us to community and social action. In academic lectures, she blends her knowledge of religion, cultural studies and literature with social issues to offer new visions of faith. In every setting, she shows audiences how our faith can free us to be more and more of who and how God calls us to be.

Read More

Book Monica A. Coleman to speak at your event.

Monica speaks with heart and vulnerability as she discusses some of the most challenging issues of our day. She speaks out on issues that churches and society often keep silent: mental health, sexual and domestic violence and religious diversity. In the pulpit, she offers a refreshing view of how scripture leads us to community and social action. In academic lectures, she blends her knowledge of religion, cultural studies and literature with social issues to offer new visions of faith. In every setting, she shows audiences how our faith can free us to be more and more of who and how God calls us to be.

Read More